Beowulf kingship essay

The representation of the dwarves in The Hobbit was influenced by his own selective reading of medieval texts regarding the Jewish people and their history. [42] The dwarves' characteristics of being dispossessed of their ancient homeland at the Lonely Mountain, and living among other groups whilst retaining their own culture are all derived from the medieval image of Jews, [42] [43] whilst their warlike nature stems from accounts in the Hebrew Bible . [42] The Dwarvish calendar invented for The Hobbit reflects the Jewish calendar in beginning in late autumn. [42] And although Tolkien denied allegory, the dwarves taking Bilbo out of his complacent existence has been seen as an eloquent metaphor for the "impoverishment of Western society without Jews." [43]

The Beowulf poet is a "master of the aristocratic oral tradition" ( Niles 1993 : 104). His work just stands out as a complex counter to the politically shaped narratives emerging in the ninth century and continuing down virtually to the end of the Anglo-Saxon period. But Beowulf does not simply stand in monumental exception. We can further suppose, along with Kirsten Hastrup ( 1990 : 6), that later writers may use old material in a spirit of corporate inclusiveness. They may, that is, assert a kind of sameness between present and past -- an assertion opposing the idea that an Anglo-Saxon poet would necessarily distance himself radically in his Anglo-Saxon present from the heroic past to which he gestures. For Beowulf this would mean that the poet of course knows the past is both past and different in some respects from his present. Yet his story provides a myth embodying both heroic values and a complex vision of worldly affairs. That myth, the poet's means of forming an image of himself and his present to himself and his peers, would have been taken up in subsequent versions of the poem and in the same ways.

Beowulf kingship essay

beowulf kingship essay

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beowulf kingship essay