Essay about democracy and poverty

Control of the Abuse of Power
One of the most common abuses of power is corruption, which occurs when government officials use public funds for their own benefit or they exercise power in an illegal way.  To protect against these abuses, democratic governments are often structured to limit the powers of government offices and the people who work for them.  For example, the executive, judicial, and legislative branches of government have distinct functions and can “check and balance” the powers of other branches.  In addition, independent agencies can investigate and impartial courts can punish government leaders and employees who abuse power.

Independent Judiciary Independent Judiciary
In democracies courts and the judicial system are impartial.  Judges and the judiciary branch must be free to act without influence or control from the executive and legislative branches of government.  They should also not be corrupt or obligated to influential individuals, businesses, or political groups.  These ideas are related to the rule of law and to controlling the abuse of power.  An independent judiciary is essential to a just and fair legal system.

The Rule of Law The Rule of Law  
In a democracy no one is above the law—not even a king, elected president, police officer, or member of the military.  Everyone must obey the law and will be held accountable if they violate it. Democracy also insists that laws are equally, fairly, and consistently enforced.

In large disputes , resist the urge to turn Wikipedia into a battleground between factions. Assume good faith that every editor and group is here to improve Wikipedia—especially if they hold a point of view with which you disagree. Work with whomever you like, but do not organize a faction that disrupts (or aims to disrupt) Wikipedia's fundamental decision-making process, which is based on building a consensus . Editors in large disputes should work in good faith to find broad principles of agreement between different viewpoints.

Emerson’s overwhelming faith in the individual is completely opposite to his views on nations: “Every actual state is corrupt.” Political parties are “made out of necessity” of the time period and not out of any underlying theory. Emerson is very critical of both major parties in his essay. [5] “From neither party, when in power, has the world any benefit to expect in science, art or humanity, at all commensurate with the resources of the nation.” Neither party is satisfactory for Emerson, and his essay he hints at the natural inequality this system adheres to, and its effects. Party politics are not the only organization Emerson has his eye on in his essay, however. Emerson also distrusts the pulpit and the press because they are conventional roles that require organizational persuasion. [4]

Essay about democracy and poverty

essay about democracy and poverty

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