Tips on writing a career research paper

By Kate Southam, Editor of .

The thought of writing a resume fills many people with dread. However, all you need is a plan that covers both lay out and content. CareerOne's website editor and Ask Kate columnist, Kate Southam passes on the advice from the experts.

The plan below should help you produce a resume that is easy to read and packed with facts employers want to know.

Contact details

Centre contact details at the top of the page. Include name, address, phone number, mobile and email. Make sure your name and phone/email contacts are on each page just in case the pages get separated after being printed out in hard copy. Only use professional-sounding email addresses. Emails used by couples or zany nicknames like [email protected] should be replaced. This is a marketing document promoting you so use some variation of your name.

Birth date and marital status

You are not legally obliged to include either detail. Including marital status in this day and age just looks plain weird to me. As for age, MANY recruiters advise against it - there is just too much age prejudice out there. However, if you think displaying your birth date would be an advantage to you, then go ahead.

Lay out

Again, this is really open to debate but the best advice I've heard is “keep it simple”. Font style should be easy to read like 11 point Times New Roman or Arial. I've noticed many candidates use a table format but I find this wastes a lot of space and thus creates more pages. Centring contact details and your Career history or Career summary (see next section) is fine and then placing the other information flush left.

Bold for headings is easier to read than bold and underline (overkill). Use dot points if you want, but just the one type. I have seen resumes with a variety of dot points. Also avoid colours. The content of the resume is the most important thing.

Summarising your strengths upfront

You can do this two ways. Either via a list of Key Strengths represented as dot points or by creating a section under a heading like Career Profile.

Key Strengths

Based on my conversations with recruitment consultants, a Key Strengths area represented with dot points is the popular option. The aim of the section is to give the person reading your resume a quick snapshot of what you have to offer so they place you in the short list pile.

For example:

As I said before, straight to the point novels with little description and smaller words are not bad novels. They can be very good novels. But wanting every novel to be written like that smacks of something the fast food generation wants, something called instant gratification. They want results now, they want their food now. Sometimes I wonder if there is a correlation to the fast food generation to people wanting their novels always simple and straight to the point. To say that novels should only be written one way, which this article seems to be saying, is a disservice to literature and it’s many diverse writers. I ask you all to think it over.

Tips on writing a career research paper

tips on writing a career research paper

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